Tuesday, September 30, 2014
thetuesdayafter:

Jenny Holzer

thetuesdayafter:

Jenny Holzer

Renee French

Renee French

nevver:

10 styles, 100 characters, Jaakko Seppälä

nevver:

10 styles, 100 characters, Jaakko Seppälä

dailyforlorn:

Things holding up things holding up things. (Thanks to Poetry Magazine for the honor.)

dailyforlorn:

Things holding up things holding up things. (Thanks to Poetry Magazine for the honor.)

Monday, September 29, 2014

22g:

WarisAhluwalia

(Source: houseofwaris.com)

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This just in from sharp-eyed Smiley Bone.

In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their characters blind-folded. Can you dig it? Wanna try it?

Read more here….

I’ll tell you something banal. We’re emotional illiterates. And not only you and I — practically everybody, that’s the depressing thing. We’re taught everything about the body and about agriculture in Madagascar and about the square root of pi, or whatever the hell it’s called, but not a word about the soul. We’re abysmally ignorant, about both ourselves and others. There’s a lot of loose talk nowadays to the effect that children should be brought up to know all about brotherhood and understanding and coexistence and equality and everything else that’s all the rage just now. But it doesn’t dawn on anyone that we must first learn something about ourselves and our own feelings. Our own fear and loneliness and anger. We’re left without a chance, ignorant and remorseful among the ruins of our ambitions. To make a child aware of it’s soul is something almost indecent…How can you understand other people if you don’t know anything about yourself? Now you’re yawning, so that’s the end of the lecture. Ingmar Bergman (via wordsnquotes)

(Source: wordsnquotes)

Sunday, September 28, 2014

viridi-luscus-monstrum:

‘Genka’ illustrations by Tadanori Yokoo

In 1975, graphic artist Tadanori Yokoo produced hundreds of pen and ink drawings for Genka (“Illusory Flowers”), a historical novel by Harumi Setouchi that recounts the struggles of Tomiko Hino, the wife of shogun Yoshimasa Ashikaga (1435-1490). The fanciful illustrations, which do not appear to directly reflect the content of the story, were published along with the novel in a long series of instalments in the Tokyo Shimbun newspaper.

(Source: fashionwear4men)